Gulab Jamun (Rose and Cardamom Flavoured Indian Doughnuts)

Gulab Jamun is an Indian Doughnut that is delicately Flavoured with cardamom and rose water.  Another one of those delicacies, that can be easily found in many Indian homes, slotted into the desserts/confectionary/sweetmeats sections of age old recipe books. Find my Family Favourite recipe shared here today.

Gulab Jamun, is usually enjoyed during festivals or special functions like engagements/marriages/Prayer gatherings.  We in South Africa, have our very own version of making these, delightfully sweet, syrup soaked ‘doughnuts’.  The South African version, differs from the typical Gulab Jamun shape found in the Indian Sub-Continent and other parts of the world, as well as using different ingredients.  This Sweetmeat, is believed to have roots in medieval India, as well as possibly brought to India by Turkic Invaders, and yet another theory, leans to Gulab Jamun being an ‘Accidental’ discovery by the personal chef of the Mugal Emperor, Shah Jahan.  The word “Gulab” derives it’s name from the Persian word of ‘Gol’ meaning FLOWER, and ‘Ab’ meaning WATER , both these found in the “ROSE WATER” infused Syrup that is a KEY Step to making Gualb Jamun. The “Jamun or Jaman” is actually a Hindi/Urdu word for a type of Indian fruit.

In the Indian Sub-Continent, these gulab jamun are made using milk solids called Khoya, then shaped into small balls like a Grape shape (These can also be referred to as Angoori jamuns), and then steeped in a sugar syrup, and almost always enjoyed directly from the syrup.

Gulab Jamun (Angoori Jamun) served in Rose flavoured Syrup

Here in South Africa, We make use of Condensed Milk, together with semolina and flour to form a dough, fry them in oil and then dip these golden fried doughnuts in syrup, excess syrup strained off and then enjoyed.

Typical ‘Tapered Leaf Shaped’ Gulab Jamun.

So recently, I had my two favourite men in my life, My Habibi/Hubby and My Abba(dad), both ask on me on separate occasions, when I was going to make them some Gulab Jamun again.  I obliged and treated them to these over the weekend.  This is another of “MY FAMILY FAVOURITE” recipe, that works perfectly every-time.

Do give this a try, and drop me your feedbacks on my various platforms, and while you trying your hands at this typical ‘South African Version of Gulab Jamun’, Do also remember to check out my other sweetmeats recipes Easy Kopra Paak  and Easy Pistachio Burfee . 

While I Hand over my Abba another one of these Golden delicious Yummies, to go with our tea, I wish you..

HAPPY Gulab Jamun Making Lovelies

?Love Marriam?

 

Gulab Jamun (Indian Doughnuts) - Marsay Family Favourite

  • Servings: 20-22
  • Difficulty: medium
  • Print

AUTHOR: FOODEVA MARSAY (@foodeva_marsay)

*WITH STEP BY STEP PICS*

INGREDIENTS

395 grams Nestle Condensed milk (1 can)
2 Tablespoon Semolina
2 Tablespoon Melted Ghee
3/4 teaspoon Bicarbonate of Soda
1/2 teaspoon Cardamom Powder (Elachie Powder)
1/4 teaspoon Nutmeg
2 and 1/2 or more Cups All Purpose Flour
1-2 Cups of Vegetable Oil for frying

INSTRUCTIONS

~ Beat together the Condensed Milk, Semolina and Ghee
~ Add the Bicarbonate of Soda, and the 2 spices, beat well.
~ Now make a slightly firm dough, using the flour. Note you may need less or more flour than stipulated.

Gulab Jamun Dough

~ Take Ping Pong Ball amounts of dough and gently roll between palms to shape into a tapered edge leaf.
~ Roll the Gulab Jamun into finger length sizes.

Finger Length Shaped Gulab Jamun

~ Heat oil to medium low setting, and gently lower 5-6 of the shaped jamuns, into the oil.
~ Allow the Jamuns to surface , and turn them a few times, until golden in colour.

Gently fry Gulab Jamun

~ Strain off excess oil onto kitchen paper towels, cool the jams for a minute or two, then drench them in the prepared sugar syrup.
~ Once dipped in sugar syrup, allow excess syrup to drip by placing the gulab jamun onto wire racks, with wax wrap on work surface to catch the dripping syrup.

After Syruping the Gulab Jamun

~ You could opt to decorate with coconut, or a sprinkle of sugar.

SIMPLE ROSE WATER SUGAR SYRUP
(@foodeva-marsay)
1 and 1/2 cups Sugar
1 Cup Water
2 Tablespoon Rose Water
Optional extras : few strands of Saffron and Whole Cardamom Pods

~ Add the Sugar to a small Saucepan, follow by adding the water and flavourings stated.
~ Stir and Bring to a gently boil, until syrup is just thickens.
~ Leave the saucepan on a low heat on stove top, to keep warm.

NOTES BY FOODEVA MARSAY
> The Dough should have a slight firm texture, and not stick to finger tips.
> Make your syrup just before starting to whip up your dough, and allow to stay warm on stove top to avoid crystallisation.
> If the Syrup does get too thick and Crystallises, Simply add in a little more water and rose water and gently warm again.
> You can also shape the dough into small balls (Angoori Jamuns) and fry.
> When rolling the Jamuns into tapered shapes, don’t roll out too thin or compacted together. Use a light pressure to roll between palms.
> Take care that the oil is not HOT, you need the Jamuns to fry at a slower rate, to ensure even browning.
> Due to the Highly condensed form of Sugar in the Condensed milk, the jamuns will naturally brown fast, as the sugar caramelises. If you notice this happening, shift the pot of oil off the stove top and direct heat.
> We want the crack to develop gradually on the frying Jamuns, so fear not when cracks begin to appear.
> For easier Dipping into Syrup, Make use of Food Tongs, gently roll the fried jamuns in the syrup and lift out to drip, onto wire racks.
> You can opt to enjoy these Gulab jamuns, Soaked well in syrup, or like me, just allowing a few seconds and rolls about in syrup, before draining them.
> The Angoori jams, are enjoyed straight out of syrup.
*Kindly share my Recipe as Posted, ©www.marriamsayed.com*

Gulab Jamun (Indian Doughnuts) –
Finger length tapering at ends, South African Style, as well as Angoori Shaped Jamuns served in Syrup.

FIND BELOW MY GULAB JAMUN RECIPE WITHOUT STEP BY STEP PICS

Gulab Jamun (Indian Doughnuts) - Marsay Family Favourite

  • Servings: 20-22
  • Difficulty: medium
  • Print

AUTHOR: FOODEVA MARSAY (@foodeva_marsay) 

INGREDIENTS

395 grams Nestle Condensed milk (1 can)
2 Tablespoon Semolina
2 Tablespoon Melted Ghee
3/4 teaspoon Bicarbonate of Soda
1/2 teaspoon Cardamom Powder (Elachie Powder)
1/4 teaspoon Nutmeg
2 and 1/2 or more Cups All Purpose Flour
1-2 Cups of Vegetable Oil for frying

INSTRUCTIONS

~ Beat together the Condensed Milk, Semolina and Ghee
~ Add the Bicarbonate of Soda, and the 2 spices, beat well.
~ Now make a slightly firm dough, using the flour. Note you may need less or more flour than stipulated.

~ Take Ping Pong Ball amounts of dough and gently roll between palms to shape into a tapered edge leaf.
~ Roll the Gulab Jamun into finger length sizes.

~ Heat oil to medium low setting, and gently lower 5-6 of the shaped jamuns, into the oil.
~ Allow the Jamuns to surface , and turn them a few times, until golden in colour.

~ Strain off excess oil onto kitchen paper towels, cool the jams for a minute or two, then drench them in the prepared sugar syrup.
~ Once dipped in sugar syrup, allow excess syrup to drip by placing the gulab jamun onto wire racks, with wax wrap on work surface to catch the dripping syrup.

~ You could opt to decorate with coconut, or a sprinkle of sugar.

SIMPLE ROSE WATER SUGAR SYRUP
(@foodeva-marsay)
1 and 1/2 cups Sugar
1 Cup Water
2 Tablespoon Rose Water
Optional extras : few strands of Saffron and Whole Cardamom Pods

~ Add the Sugar to a small Saucepan, follow by adding the water and flavourings stated.
~ Stir and Bring to a gently boil, until syrup is just thickens.
~ Leave the saucepan on a low heat on stove top, to keep warm.

NOTES BY FOODEVA MARSAY
> The Dough should have a slight firm texture, and not stick to finger tips.
> Make your syrup just before starting to whip up your dough, and allow to stay warm on stove top to avoid crystallisation.
> If the Syrup does get too thick and Crystallises, Simply add in a little more water and rose water and gently warm again.
> You can also shape the dough into small balls (Angoori Jamuns) and fry.
> When rolling the Jamuns into tapered shapes, don’t roll out too thin or compacted together. Use a light pressure to roll between palms.
> Take care that the oil is not HOT, you need the Jamuns to fry at a slower rate, to ensure even browning.
> Due to the Highly condensed form of Sugar in the Condensed milk, the jamuns will naturally brown fast, as the sugar caramelises. If you notice this happening, shift the pot of oil off the stove top and direct heat.
> We want the crack to develop gradually on the frying Jamuns, so fear not when cracks begin to appear.
> For easier Dipping into Syrup, Make use of Food Tongs, gently roll the fried jamuns in the syrup and lift out to drip, onto wire racks.
> You can opt to enjoy these Gulab jamuns, Soaked well in syrup, or like me, just allowing a few seconds and rolls about in syrup, before draining them.
> The Angoori jams, are enjoyed straight out of syrup.
*Kindly share my Recipe as Posted, ©www.marriamsayed.com*

Gulab Jamun
 

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